URLs for Books

Your last ebook:

You dont read ebooks at this site.

Total ebooks on site: about 25000

You can read and download its for free!

Ebooks by authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 
Cordier, Henri / The Travels of Marco Polo — Volume 2
E-text prepared by Charles Franks, Robert Connal, John Williams, and
Prooject Distributed Proofreaders



Note: Volume I of this work is also in Project 's library.
See http://www..net/etext/10636





THE TRAVELS OF MARCO POLO

THE COMPLETE YULE-CORDIER EDITION

Including the unabridged third edition (1903) of Henry Yule's annotated
translation, as revised by Henri Cordier; together with Cordier's later
volume of notes and addenda (1920)

IN TWO VOLUMES

VOLUME II

Containing the second volume of the 1903 edition and the 1920 volume of
addenda (two original volumes bound as one)





[Illustration: "MARCVS POLVS VENETVS TOTIVS ORBIS ET INDIE PEREGRATOR
PRIMVS"

Copied by permission from a painting bearing the above inscription in the
Gallery of Monsignore Padia in Rome]





CONTENTS OF VOL. II.


SYNOPSIS OF CONTENTS

EXPLANATORY LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

THE BOOK OF MARCO POLO

APPENDICES

INDEX








SYNOPSIS OF CONTENTS.




BOOK SECOND--(Continued).


PART II.

Journey to the West and South-West of Cathay.


XXXV.--HERE BEGINS THE DESCRIPTION OF THE INTERIOR OF CATHAY; AND FIRST OF
THE RIVER PULISANGHIN

NOTES.--1. Marco's Route. 2. The Bridge Pul-i-sangin, or Lu-ku-k'iao.

XXXVI.--ACCOUNT OF THE CITY OF JUJU

NOTES.--1. The Silks called _Sendals_. 2. Chochau. 3. Bifurcation of Two
Great Roads at this point.

XXXVII.--THE KINGDOM OF TAIANFU

NOTES.--1. Acbaluc. 2. T'ai-yuan fu. 3. Grape-wine of that place.
4. P'ing-yang fu.

XXXVIII.--CONCERNING THE CASTLE OF CAICHU. THE GOLDEN KING AND PRESTER JOHN

NOTES.--1. The Story and Portrait of the _Roi d'Or_. 2. Effeminacy
reviving in every Chinese Dynasty.

XXXIX.--HOW PRESTER JOHN TREATED THE GOLDEN KING HIS PRISONER

XL.--CONCERNING THE GREAT RIVER CARAMORAN AND THE CITY OF CACHANFU

NOTES.--1. The Kar Muren. 2. Former growth of silk in Shan-si and
Shen-si. 3. The _akch_ or _asper_.

XLI.--CONCERNING THE CITY OF KENJANFU

NOTES.--1. Morus alba. 2. Geography of the Route since Chapter XXXVIII.
3. Kenjanfu or Si-ngan fu; the Christian monument there. 4. Prince
Mangala.

XLII.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF CUNCUN, WHICH IS RIGHT WEARISOME TO
TRAVEL THROUGH

NOTE.--The Mountain Road to Southern Shen-si.

XLIII.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF ACBALEC MANZI

NOTES.--1. Geography, and doubts about Acbalec. 2. Further Journey into
Sze-ch'wan.

XLIV.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF SINDAFU

NOTES.--1. Ch'ng-tu fu. 2. The Great River or _Kiang_. 3. The word
_Comereque_. 4. The Bridge-Tolls. 5. Correction of Text.

XLV.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF TEBET

NOTES.--1. The Part of Tibet and events referred to. 2. Noise of burning
bamboos. 3. Road retains its desolate character. 4. Persistence of
eccentric manners illustrated. 5. Name of the Musk animal.

XLVI.--FURTHER DISCOURSE CONCERNING TEBET

NOTES.--1. Explanatory. 2. "_Or de Paliolle_." 3. Cinnamon. 4. 5. Great
Dogs, and _Beyamini_ oxen.

XLVII.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF CAINDU

NOTES.--1. Explanation from Ramusio. 2. Pearls of Inland Waters. 3. Lax
manners. 4. Exchange of Salt for Gold. 5. Salt currency. 6. Spiced Wine.
7. Plant like the Clove, spoken of by Polo. Tribes of this Tract.

XLVIII.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF CARAJAN

NOTES.--1. Geography of the Route between Sindafu or Ch'ng-tu fu, and
Carajan or Yun-nan. 2. Christians and Mahomedans in Yun-nan. 3. Wheat.
4. Cowries. 5. Brine-spring. 6. Parallel.

XLIX.--CONCERNING A FURTHER PART OF THE PROVINCE OF CARAJAN

NOTES.--1. City of Talifu. 2. Gold. 3. Crocodiles. 4. Yun-nan horses
and riders. Arms of the Aboriginal Tribes. 5. Strange superstition and
parallels.

L.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF ZARDANDAN

NOTES.--1. Carajan and Zardandan. 2. The Gold-Teeth. 3. Male Indolence.
4. The Couvade. (See App. L. 8.) 5. Abundance of Gold. Relation of Gold
to Silver. 6. Worship of the Ancestor. 7. Unhealthiness of the climate.
8. Tallies. 9.-12. Medicine-men or Devil-dancers; extraordinary identity
of practice in various regions.

LI.--WHEREIN IS RELATED HOW THE KING OF MIEN AND BANGALA VOWED VENGEANCE
AGAINST THE GREAT KAAN

NOTES.--1. Chronology. 2. Mien or Burma. Why the King may have been
called King of Bengal also. 3. Numbers alleged to have been carried on
elephants.

LII.--OF THE BATTLE THAT WAS FOUGHT BY THE GREAT KAAN'S HOST AND HIS
SENESCHAL AGAINST THE KING OF MIEN

NOTES.--1. Nasruddin. 2. Cyrus's Camels. 3. Chinese Account of the
Action. General Correspondence of the Chinese and Burmese Chronologies.

LIII.--OF THE GREAT DESCENT THAT LEADS TOWARDS THE KINGDOM OF MIEN

NOTES.--1. Market-days. 2. Geographical difficulties.

LIV.--CONCERNING THE CITY OF MIEN, AND THE TWO TOWERS THAT ARE THEREIN, ONE
OF GOLD, AND THE OTHER OF SILVER

NOTES.--1. Amien. 2. Chinese Account of the Invasion of Burma. Comparison
with Burmese Annals. The City intended. The Pagodas. 3. Wild Oxen.

LV.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF BANGALA

NOTES.--1. Polo's view of Bengal; and details of his account illustrated.
2. Great Cattle.

LVI.--DISCOURSES OF THE PROVINCE OF CAUGIGU

NOTE.--A Part of Laos. Papesifu. Chinese Geographical Etymologies.

LVII.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF ANIN

NOTES.--1. The Name. Probable identification of territory. 2. Textual.

LVIII.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF COLOMAN

NOTES.--1. The Name. The Kolo-man. 2. Natural defences of Kwei-chau.

LIX.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF CUIJU

NOTES.--1. Kwei-chau. Phungan-lu. 2. Grass-cloth. 3. Tigers. 4. Great
Dogs. 5. Silk. 6. Geographical Review of the Route since Chapter LV.
7. Return to Juju.




BOOK SECOND.

(Continued.)


PART III.

Journey Southward through Eastern Provinces of Cathay and Manzi.


LX.--CONCERNING THE CITIES OF CACANFU AND CHANGLU

NOTES.--1. Pauthier's Identifications. 2. Changlu. The Burning of the
Dead ascribed to the Chinese.

LXI.--CONCERNING THE CITY OF CHINANGLI, AND THAT OF TADINFU, AND THE
REBELLION OF LITAN

NOTES.--1. T'si-nan fu. 2. Silk of Shan-tung. 3. Title _Sangon_. 4. Agul
and Mangkutai. 5. History of Litan's Revolt.

LXII.--CONCERNING THE NOBLE CITY OF SINJUMATU

NOTE.--The City intended. The Great Canal.

LXIII.--CONCERNING THE CITIES OF LINJU AND PIJU

NOTES.--1. Linju. 2. Piju.

LXIV.--CONCERNING THE CITY OF SIJU, AND THE GREAT RIVER CARAMORAN

NOTES.--1. Siju. 2. The Hwang-Ho and its changes. 3. Entrance to Manzi;
that name for Southern China.

LXV.--HOW THE GREAT KAAN CONQUERED THE PROVINCE OF MANZI

NOTES.--1. Meaning and application of the title _Faghfur_. 2. Chinese
self-devotion. 3. Bayan the Great Captain. 4. His lines of Operation.
5. The Juggling Prophecy. 6. The Fall of the Sung Dynasty. 7. Exposure of
Infants, and Foundling Hospitals.

LXVI.--CONCERNING THE CITY OF COIGANJU

NOTE.--Hwai-ngan fu.

LXVII.--OF THE CITIES OF PAUKIN AND CAYU

NOTE.--Pao-yng and Kao-yu.

LXVIII.--OF THE CITIES OF TIJU, TINJU, AND YANJU

NOTES.--1. Cities between the Canal and the Sea. 2. Yang-chau. 3. Marco
Polo's Employment at this City.

LXIX.--CONCERNING THE CITY OF NANGHIN

NOTE.--Ngan-king.

LXX.--CONCERNING THE VERY NOBLE CITY OF SAIANFU, AND HOW ITS CAPTURE WAS
EFFECTED

NOTES.--1. and 2. Various Readings. 3. Digression on the Military Engines
of the Middle Ages. 4. Mangonels of Coeur de Lion. 5. Difficulties
connected with Polo's Account of this Siege.

LXXI.--CONCERNING THE CITY OF SINJU AND THE GREAT RIVER KIAN

NOTES.--1. I-chin hien. 2. The Great Kiang. 3. Vast amount of tonnage
on Chinese Waters. 4. Size of River Vessels. 5. Bamboo Tow-lines.
6. Picturesque Island Monasteries.

LXXII.--CONCERNING THE CITY OF CAIJU

NOTES.--1. Kwa-chau. 2. The Grand Canal and Rice-Transport. 3. The Golden
Island.

LXXIII.--OF THE CITY OF CHINGHIANFU

NOTE.--Chin-kiang fu. Mar Sarghis, the Christian Governor.

LXXIV.--OF THE CITY OF CHINGINJU AND THE SLAUGHTER OF CERTAIN ALANS THERE

NOTES.--1. Chang-chau. 2. Employment of Alans in the Mongol Service.
3. The Chang-chau Massacre. Mongol Cruelties.

LXXV.--OF THE NOBLE CITY OF SUJU

NOTES.--1. Su-chau. 2. Bridges of that part of China. 3. Rhubarb; its
mention here seems erroneous. 4. The Cities of Heaven and Earth. Ancient
incised Plan of Su-chau. 5. Hu-chau, Wu-kiang and Kya-hing.

LXXVI.--DESCRIPTION OF THE GREAT CITY OF KINSAY, WHICH IS THE CAPITAL OF
THE WHOLE COUNTRY OF MANZI

NOTES.--1. King-sz now Hang-chau. 2. The circuit ascribed to the City;
the Bridges. 3. Hereditary Trades. 4. The Si-hu or Western Lake.
5. Dressiness of the People. 6. Charitable Establishments. 7. Paved
roads. 8. Hot and Cold Baths. 9. Kanpu, and the Hang-chau Estuary.
10. The Nine Provinces of Manzi. 11. The Kaan's Garrisons in Manzi.
12. Mourning costume. 13. 14. Tickets recording inmates of houses.

LXXVII.--[FURTHER PARTICULARS CONCERNING THE GREAT CITY OF KINSAY.]
(From Ramusio only.)

NOTES.--1. Remarks on these supplementary details. 2. Tides in the
Hang-chau Estuary. 3. Want of a good Survey of Hang-chau. The Squares.
4. Marco ignores pork. 5. Great Pears: Peaches. 6. Textual. 7. Chinese
use of Pepper. 8. Chinese claims to a character for Good Faith.
9. Pleasure-parties on the Lake. 10. Chinese Carriages. 11. The Sung
Emperor. 12. The Sung Palace. Extracts regarding this Great City from
other mediaeval writers, European and Asiatic. Martini's Description.

LXXVIII.--TREATING OF THE YEARLY REVENUE THAT THE GREAT KAAN HATH FROM
KINSAY

NOTES.--1. Textual. 2. Calculations as to the values spoken of.

LXXIX.--OF THE CITY OF TANPIJU AND OTHERS

NOTES.--1. Route from Hang-chau southward. 2. Bamboos. 3. Identification
of places. Chang-shan the key to the route.

LXXX.--CONCERNING THE KINGDOM OF FUJU

NOTES.--1. "Fruit like Saffron." 2. 3. Cannibalism ascribed to Mountain
Tribes on this route. 4 Kien-ning fu. 5. Galingale. 6. Fleecy Fowls.
7. Details of the Journey in Fo-kien and various readings. 8. Unken.
Introduction of Sugar-refining into China.

LXXXI.--CONCERNING THE GREATNESS OF THE CITY OF FUJU

NOTES.--1. The name _Chonka_, applied to Fo-kien here. _Cayton_ or
_Zayton_. 2. Objections that have been made to identity of _Fuju_ and
Fu-chau. 3. The Min River.

LXXXII.--OF THE CITY AND GREAT HAVEN OF ZAYTON

NOTES.--1. The Camphor Laurel. 2. The Port of Zayton or T'swan-chau;
Recent objections to this identity. Probable origin of the word Satin.
3. Chinese Consumption of Pepper. 4. Artists in Tattooing. 5. Position
of the Porcelain manufacture spoken of. Notions regarding the _Great
River_ of China. 6. Fo-kien dialects and variety of spoken language in
China. 7. From Ramusio.




BOOK THIRD.

Japan, the Archipelago, Southern India, and the Coasts and Islands of the
Indian Sea.


I.--OF THE MERCHANT SHIPS OF MANZI THAT SAIL UPON THE INDIAN SEAS

NOTES.--1. Pine Timber. 2. Rudder and Masts. 3. Watertight Compartments.
4. Chinese substitute for Pitch. 5. Oars used by Junks. 6. Descriptions
of Chinese Junks from other Mediaeval Writers.

II.--DESCRIPTION OF THE ISLAND OF CHIPANGU, AND THE GREAT KAAN'S DESPATCH
OF A HOST AGAINST IT.

NOTES.--1. Chipangu or Japan. 2. Abundance of Gold. 3. The Golden Palace.
4. Japanese Pearls. Red Pearls.

III.--WHAT FURTHER CAME OF THE GREAT KAAN'S EXPEDITION AGAINST CHIPANGU

NOTES.--1. Kbli's attempts against Japan. Japanese Narrative of the
Expedition here spoken of. (See App. L. 9.) 2. Species of Torture.
3. Devices to procure Invulnerability.

IV.--CONCERNING THE FASHION OF THE IDOLS

NOTES.--1. Many-limbed Idols. 2. The Philippines and Moluccas. 3. The
name _Chin_ or _China_. 4. The Gulf of Cheinan.

V.--OF THE GREAT COUNTRY CALLED CHAMBA

NOTES.--1. Champa, and Kbli's dealings with it. (See App. L. 10).
2. Chronology. 3. Eagle-wood and Ebony. Polo's use of Persian words.

VI.--CONCERNING THE GREAT ISLAND OF JAVA

NOTE.--Java; its supposed vast extent. Kbli's expedition against it and
failure.

VII.--WHEREIN THE ISLES OF SONDUR AND CONDUR ARE SPOKEN OF; AND THE KINGDOM
OF LOCAC

NOTES.--1. Textual. 2. Pulo Condore. 3. The Kingdom of Locac, Southern
Siam.

VIII.--OF THE ISLAND CALLED PENTAM, AND THE CITY MALAIUR

NOTES.--1. Bintang. 2. The Straits of Singapore. 3. Remarks on the Malay
Chronology. Malaiur probably Palembang.

IX.--CONCERNING THE ISLAND OF JAVA THE LESS. THE KINGDOMS OF FERLEC AND
BASMA

NOTES.--1. The Island of Sumatra: application of the term _Java_.
2. Products of Sumatra. The six kingdoms. 3. Ferlec or Parlk. The
Battas. 4. Basma, Pacem, or Pasei. 5. The Elephant and the Rhinoceros.
The Legend of Monoceros and the Virgin. 6. Black Falcon.

X.--THE KINGDOMS OF SAMARA AND DAGROIAN

NOTES.--1. Samara, Sumatra Proper. 2. The Tramontaine and the Mestre.
3. The Malay Toddy-Palm. 4. Dagroian. 5. Alleged custom of eating dead
relatives.

XI.--OF THE KINGDOMS OF LAMBRI AND FANSUR

NOTES.--1. Lambri. 2. Hairy and Tailed Men. 3. Fansur and Camphor
Fansuri. Sumatran Camphor. 4. The Sago-Palm. 5. Remarks on Polo's
Sumatran Kingdoms.

XII.--CONCERNING THE ISLAND OF NECUVERAN

NOTE.--Gauenispola, and the Nicobar Islands.

XIII.--CONCERNING THE ISLAND OF ANGAMANAIN

NOTE.--The Andaman Islands.

XIV.--CONCERNING THE ISLAND OF SEILAN

NOTES.--1. Chinese Chart. 2. Exaggeration of Dimensions. The Name.
3. Sovereigns then ruling Ceylon. 4. Brazil Wood and Cinnamon. 5. The
Great Ruby.

XV.--THE SAME CONTINUED. THE HISTORY OF SAGAMONI BORCAN AND THE BEGINNING
OF IDOLATRY

NOTES.--1. Adam's Peak, and the Foot thereon. 2. The Story of Sakya-Muni
Buddha. The History of Saints Barlaam and Josaphat; a Christianised
version thereof. 3. High Estimate of Buddha's Character. 4. Curious
Parallel Passages. 5. Pilgrimages to the Peak. 6. The Ptra of Buddha,
and the Tooth-Relic. 7. Miraculous endowments of the Ptra; it is the
Holy Grail of Buddhism.

XVI.--CONCERNING THE GREAT PROVINCE OF MAABAR, WHICH IS CALLED INDIA THE
GREATER, AND IS ON THE MAINLAND

NOTES.--1. Ma'bar, its definition, and notes on its Mediaeval History.
2. The Pearl Fishery.

XVII.--CONTINUES TO SPEAK OF THE PROVINCE OF MAABAR

NOTES.--1. Costume. 2. Hindu Royal Necklace. 3. Hindu use of the Rosary.
4. The Saggio. 5. Companions in Death; the word _Amok_. 6. Accumulated
Wealth of Southern India at this time. 7. Horse Importation from the
Persian Gulf. 8. Religious Suicides. 9. Suttees. 10. Worship of the Ox.
The Govis. 11. Verbal. 12. The Thomacides. 13. Ill-success of
Horse-breeding in S. India. 14. Curious Mode of Arrest for Debt. 15. The
Rainy Seasons. 16. Omens of the Hindus. 17. Strange treatment of Horses.
18. The Devadsis. 19. Textual.

XVIII.--DISCOURSING OF THE PLACE WHERE LIETH THE BODY OF ST. THOMAS THE
APOSTLE; AND OF THE MIRACLES THEREOF

NOTES.--1. Mailapr. 2. The word _Avarian_. 3. Miraculous Earth. 4. The
Traditions of St. Thomas in India. The ancient Church at his Tomb; the
ancient Cross preserved on St. Thomas's Mount. 5. White Devils. 6. The
Yak's Tail.

XIX.--CONCERNING THE KINGDOM OF MUTFILI

NOTES.--1. Motapall. The Widow Queen of Telingana. 2. The Diamond Mines,
and the Legend of the Diamond Gathering. 3. Buckram.

XX.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF LAR WHENCE THE BRAHMANS COME

NOTES.--1. Abraiaman. The Country of Lar. Hindu Character. 2. The Kingdom
of Soli or Chola. 3. Lucky and Unlucky Days and Hours. The Canonical
Hours of the Church. 4. Omens. 5. Jogis. The Ox-emblem. 6. Verbal.
7. Recurrence of Human Eccentricities.

XXI.--CONCERNING THE CITY OF CAIL

NOTES.--1. Kyal; its true position. _Kolkhoi_ identified. 2. The King
Ashar or As-char. 3. Correa, Note. 4. Betel-chewing. 5. Duels.

XXII.--OF THE KINGDOM OF COILUM

NOTES.--1. Coilum, Coilon, Kaulam, Columbum, Quilon. Ancient Christian
Churches. 2. Brazil Wood: notes on the name. 3. Columbine Ginger and
other kinds. 4. Indigo. 5. Black Lions. 6. Marriage Customs.

XXIII.--OF THE COUNTRY CALLED COMARI

NOTES.--1. Cape Comorin. 2. The word _Gat-paul_.

XXIV.--CONCERNING THE KINGDOM ELI

NOTES.--1. Mount D'Ely, and the City of Hili-Marawi. 2. Textual.
3. Produce. 4. Piratical custom. 5. Wooden Anchors.

XXV.--CONCERNING THE KINGDOM OF MELIBAR

NOTES.--1. Dislocation of Polo's Indian Geography. The name of Malabar.
2. Verbal. 3. Pirates. 4. Cassia: Turbit: Cubebs. 5. Cessation of direct
Chinese trade with Malabar.

XXVI.--CONCERNING THE KINGDOM OF GOZURAT

NOTES.--1. Topographical Confusion. 2. Tamarina. 3. Tall Cotton Trees.
4. Embroidered Leather-work.

XXVII.--CONCERNING THE KINGDOM OF TANA

NOTES.--1. Tana, and the Konkan. 2. Incense of Western India.

XXVIII.--CONCERNING THE KINGDOM OF CAMBAET

NOTE.--Cambay.

XXIX.--CONCERNING THE KINGDOM OF SEMENAT

NOTE.--Somnath, and the so-called Gates of Somnath.

XXX.--CONCERNING THE KINGDOM OF KESMACORAN

NOTES.--1. Kij-Mekrn. Limit of India. 2. Recapitulation of Polo's Indian
Kingdoms.

XXXI.--DISCOURSETH OF THE TWO ISLANDS CALLED MALE AND FEMALE, AND WHY THEY
ARE SO CALLED

NOTE.--The Legend and its diffusion.

XXXII.--CONCERNING THE ISLAND OF SCOTRA

NOTES.--1. Whales of the Indian Seas. 2. Socotra and its former
Christianity. 3. Piracy at Socotra. 4. Sorcerers.

XXXIII.--CONCERNING THE ISLAND OF MADEIGASCAR

NOTES.--1. Madagascar; some confusion here with Magadoxo. 2. Sandalwood.
3. Whale-killing. The _Capidoglio_ or Sperm-Whale. 4. The Currents
towards the South. 5. The Rukh (and see Appendix L. 11). 6. More on the
dimensions assigned thereto. 7. Hippopotamus Teeth.

XXXIV.--CONCERNING THE ISLAND OF ZANGHIBAR. A WORD ON INDIA IN GENERAL

NOTES.--1. Zangibar; Negroes. 2. Ethiopian Sheep. 3. Giraffes. 4. Ivory
trade. 5. Error about Elephant-taming. 6. Number of Islands assigned to
the Indian Sea. 7. The Three Indies, and various distributions thereof.
Polo's Indian Geography.

XXXV.--TREATING OF THE GREAT PROVINCE OF ABASH, WHICH IS MIDDLE INDIA, AND
IS ON THE MAINLAND

NOTES.--1. Habash or Abyssinia. Application of the name India to it.
2. Fire Baptism ascribed to the Abyssinian Christians. 3. Polo's idea of
the position of Aden. 4. Taming of the African Elephant for War.
5. Marco's Story of the Abyssinian Invasion of the Mahomedan Low-Country,
and Review of Abyssinian Chronology in connection therewith. 6. Textual.

XXXVI.--CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF ADEN

NOTES.--1. The Trade to Alexandria from India vi Aden. 2. "_Roncins
deux selles_." 3. The Sultan of Aden. The City and its Great Tanks.
4. The Loss of Acre.

XXXVII.--CONCERNING THE CITY OF ESHER

NOTES.--1. Shihr. 2. Frankincense. 3. Four-horned Sheep. 4. Cattle fed on
Fish. 5. Parallel passage.

XXXVIII.--CONCERNING THE CITY OF DUFAR

NOTES.--1. Dhofar. 2. Notes on Frankincense.

XXXIX.--CONCERNING THE GULF OF CALATU, AND THE CITY SO CALLED

NOTES.--1. Kalht. 2. "_En fra terre_." 3. Maskat.

XL.--RETURNS TO THE CITY OF HORMOS WHEREOF WE SPOKE FORMERLY

NOTES.--1. Polo's distances and bearings in these latter chapters.
2. Persian _Bd-grs_ or wind-catching chimneys. 3. Island of Kish.




BOOK FOURTH.

Wars among the Tartar Princes, and some Account of the Northern
Countries.


I.--CONCERNING GREAT TURKEY

NOTES.--1. Kaidu Khan. 2. His frontier towards the Great Kaan.

II.--OF CERTAIN BATTLES THAT WERE FOUGHT BY KING CAIDU AGAINST THE ARMIES
OF HIS UNCLE THE GREAT KAAN

NOTES.--1. Textual. 2. "_Araines_." 3. Chronology in connection with the
events described.

III.--[1]WHAT THE GREAT KAAN SAID TO THE MISCHIEF DONE BY CAIDU HIS NEPHEW

IV.--OF THE EXPLOITS OF KING CAIDU'S VALIANT DAUGHTER

NOTE.--Her name explained. Remarks on the story.

V.--HOW ABAGA SENT HIS SON ARGON IN COMMAND AGAINST KING CAIDU (Extract and
Substance.)

NOTES.--1. Government of the Khorasan frontier. 2. The Historical Events.

VI.--HOW ARGON AFTER THE BATTLE HEARD THAT HIS FATHER WAS DEAD AND WENT TO
ASSUME THE SOVEREIGNTY AS WAS HIS RIGHT

NOTES.--1. Death of Abaka. 2. Textual. 3. Ahmad Tigudar.

VII.--[1]HOW ACOMAT SOLDAN SET OUT WITH HIS HOST AGAINST HIS NEPHEW WHO WAS
COMING TO CLAIM THE THRONE THAT BELONGED TO HIM

VIII.--[1]HOW ARGON TOOK COUNSEL WITH HIS FOLLOWERS ABOUT ATTACKING HIS
UNCLE ACOMAT SOLDAN

IX.--[1]HOW THE BARONS OF ARGON ANSWERED HIS ADDRESS

X.--[1]THE MESSAGE SENT BY ARGON TO ACOMAT

XI.--HOW ACOMAT REPLIED TO ARGON'S MESSAGE

XII.--OF THE BATTLE BETWEEN ARGON AND ACOMAT, AND THE CAPTIVITY OF ARGON

NOTES.--1. Verbal. 2. Historical.

XIII.--HOW ARGON WAS DELIVERED FROM PRISON

XIV.--HOW ARGON GOT THE SOVEREIGNTY AT LAST

XV.--[1]HOW ACOMAT WAS TAKEN PRISONER

XVI.--HOW ACOMAT WAS SLAIN BY ORDER OF HIS NEPHEW

XVII.--HOW ARGON WAS RECOGNISED AS SOVEREIGN

NOTES.--1. The historical circumstances and persons named in these
chapters. 2. Arghn's accession and death.

XVIII.--HOW KIACATU SEIZED THE SOVEREIGNTY AFTER ARGON'S DEATH

NOTE.--The reign and character of Kaikht.

XIX.--HOW BAIDU SEIZED THE SOVEREIGNTY AFTER THE DEATH OF KIACATU

NOTES.--1. Baidu's alleged Christianity. 2. Ghzn Khan.

XX.--CONCERNING KING CONCHI WHO RULES THE FAR NORTH

NOTES.--1. Kaunchi Khan. 2. Siberia. 3. Dog-sledges. 4. The animal here
styled _Erculin_. The Vair. 5. Yugria.

XXI.--CONCERNING THE LAND OF DARKNESS

NOTES.--1. The Land of Darkness. 2. The Legend of the Mares and their
Foals. 3. Dumb Trade with the People of the Darkness.

XXII.--DESCRIPTION OF ROSIA AND ITS PEOPLE. PROVINCE OF LAC

NOTES.--1. Old Accounts of Russia. Russian Silver and Rubles. 2. Lac, or
Wallachia. 3. Oroech, Norway (?) or the Waraeg Country (?)

XXIII.--HE BEGINS TO SPEAK OF THE STRAITS OF CONSTANTINOPLE, BUT DECIDES TO
LEAVE THAT MATTER

XXIV.--CONCERNING THE TARTARS OF THE PONENT AND THEIR LORDS

NOTES.--1. The Comanians; the Alans; Majar; Zic; the Goths of the Crimea;
Gazaria. 2. The Khans of Kipchak or the Golden Horde; errors in Polo's
list. Extent of their Empire.

XXV.--OF THE WAR THAT AROSE BETWEEN ALAU AND BARCA, AND THE BATTLES THAT
THEY FOUGHT (Extracts and Substance.)

NOTES.--1. Verbal. 2. The Sea of Sarai. 3. The War here spoken of.
Wassf's rigmarole.

XXVI.--[1]HOW BARCA AND HIS ARMY ADVANCED TO MEET ALAU

XXVII.--[1]HOW ALAU ADDRESSED HIS FOLLOWERS

XXVIII.--[1]OF THE GREAT BATTLE BETWEEN ALAU AND BARCA

XXIX.--HOW TOTAMANGU WAS LORD OF THE TARTARS OF THE PONENT; AND AFTER HIM
TOCTAI

NOTE.--Confusions in the Text. Historical circumstances connected with
the Persons spoken of. Toctai and Noghai Khan. Symbolic Messages.

XXX.--[1]OF THE SECOND MESSAGE THAT TOCTAI SENT TO NOGAI

XXXI.--[1]HOW TOCTAI MARCHED AGAINST NOGAI

XXXII.--[1]HOW TOCTAI AND NOGAI ADDRESS THEIR PEOPLE, AND THE NEXT DAY JOIN
BATTLE

XXXIII.--[1]THE VALIANT FEATS AND VICTORY OF KING NOGAI

XXXIV. AND LAST. CONCLUSION


[1] Of chapters so marked nothing is given but the substance in brief.




APPENDICES.


A. Genealogy of the House of Chinghiz to the End of the Thirteenth Century

B. The Polo Families:--
(I.) Genealogy of the Family of Marco Polo the Traveller
(II.) The Polos of San Geremia

C. Calendar of Documents relating to Marco Polo and his Family

D. Comparative Specimens of the Different Recensions of Polo's Text

E. Preface to Pipino's Latin Version

F. Note of MSS. of Marco Polo's Book, so far as known:
General Distribution of MSS.
List of Miniatures in two of the finer MSS.
List of MSS. of Marco Polo's Book, so far as they are known

G. Diagram showing Filiation of Chief MSS. and Editions of Marco Polo

H. Bibliography:--
(I.) Principal Editions of Marco Polo's Book
(II.) Bibliography of Printed Editions
(III.) Titles of Sundry Books and Papers treating of Marco Polo and his
Book

I. Titles of Works quoted by Abbreviated References in this Book

K. Values of Certain Moneys, Weights, and Measures occurring in this Book.

L. Supplementary Notes to the Book of Marco Polo
1. The Polos at Acre.
2. Sorcery in Kashmir.
3. PAONANO PAO.
4. Pamir.
5. Number of Pamirs.
6. Site of Pein.
7. Fire-arms.
8. La Couvade.
9. Alacan
10. Champa.
11. Ruck Quills.
12. A Spanish Marco Polo.
13. Sir John Mandeville.

INDEX




EXPLANATORY LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS TO VOLUME II.


INSERTED PLATES AND MAPS.


Portrait bearing the inscription "MARCUS POLVS VENETVS TOTIVS ORBIS ET
INDIE PEREGRATOR PRIMVS." In the Gallery of Monsignor _Badia_ at Rome;
copied by Sign. GIUSEPPE GNOLI, Rome.

Medallion, representing Marco Polo in the PRISON of GENOA, dictating his
story to Master RUSTICIAN of PISA, drawn by Signor QUINTO CENNI from a
rough design by Sir HENRY YULE.

The celebrated CHRISTIAN INSCRIPTION OF SI-NGAN FU. Photolithographed by Mr
W. GRIGG, from a Rubbing of the original monument, given to the Editor by
the Baron F. von Richthofen.

This rubbing is more complete than that used in the first edition, for
which the Editor was indebted to the kindness of William Lockhart, Esq.

The LAKE of TALI (CARAJAN of Polo) from the Northern End. Woodcut after
Lieut. DELAPORTE, borrowed from Lieut. GARNIER'S Narrative in the _Tour du
Monde_.

Suspension Bridge, neighbourhood of TALI. From a photograph by M. Tannant.

The CITY of MIEN, with the Gold and Silver Towers. From a drawing by the
Editor, based upon his sketches of the remains of the City so called by
Marco Polo, viz., PAGN, the mediaeval capital of Burma.

Itineraries of Marco Polo. No. V. The INDO-CHINESE COUNTRIES. With a small
sketch extracted from a Chinese Map in the possession of Baron von
Richthofen, showing the position of KIEN-CH'ANG, the _Caindu_ of Marco
Polo.

Sketch Map exhibiting the VARIATIONS of the TWO GREAT RIVERS of China,
within the Period of History.

The CITY of SU-CHAU. Reduced by the Editor from a Rubbing of a Plan incised
on Marble, and preserved in the Great Confucian Temple in the City.

The date of the original set of Maps, of which this was one, is
uncertain, owing to the partial illegibility of the Inscription; but it
is subsequent to A.D. 1000. They were engraved on the Marble A.D. 1247.
Many of the names have been obliterated, and a few of those given in the
copy are filled up from modern information, as the Editor learns from
Mr. Wylie, to whom he owes this valuable illustration.

Map of HANG-CHAU FU and its LAKE, from Chinese Sources.

The Map as published in the former edition was based on a Chinese Map in
the possession of Dr. W. Lockhart, with some particulars from Maps in a
copy of the Local Topography, _Hang-Chau-fu-chi_, in the B. Museum
Library. In the second edition the Map has been entirely redrawn by the
Editor, with many corrections, and with the aid of new materials,
supplied by the kindness of the Rev. G. Moule of the Church Mission at
Hang-chau. These materials embrace a Paper read by Mr. Moule before the
N. China Branch of the R. As. Soc. at Shang-hai; a modern engraved Map of
the City on a large scale; and a large MS. Map of the City and Lake,
compiled by John Shing, Tailor, a Chinese Christian and Catechist;

The small Side-plan is the City of SI-NGAN FU, from a plan published
during the Mongol rule, in the 14th century, a tracing of which was sent
by Mr. Wylie. The following references could not be introduced in
lettering for want of space:--

1. Yuen-Tu-Kwan (Tauist Monastery).
2. Chapel of Hien-ning Prince.
3. Leih-Ching Square (Fang).
4. Tauist Monastery.
5. Kie-lin General Court.
6. Ancestral Chapel of Yang-Wan-Kang.
7. Chapel of the Mid-year Genius.
8. Temple of the Martial Peaceful King.
9. Stone where officers are selected.
10. Mews.
11. Jasper-Waves Square (Fang).
12. Court of Enquiry.
13. Gate of the Fang-Yuen Circuit.
14. Bright Gate.
15. Northern Tribunal.
16. Refectory.
17. Chapel of the Fang-Yuen Prince.
18. Embroidery manufactory.
19. Hwa-li Temple.
20. Old Superintendency of Investigations.
21. Superintendent of Works.
22. Ka-yuen Monastery.
23. Prefectural Confucian Temple.
24. Benevolent Institution.
25. Temple of Tu-Ke-King.
26. Balustrade enclosure.
27. Medicine-Bazar Street.
28. Tsin and Ching States Chapel.
29. Square of the Double Cassia Tree.

N.B.--The shaded spaces are marked in the original _Min-Keu_
"Dwellings of the People."

Plan of SOUTHERN PART of the CITY of KING-SZ (or Hang-chau), with the
PALACE of the SUNG EMPERORS. From a Chinese Plan forming part of a Reprint
of the official Topography of the City during the period _Hien-Shun_
(1265-1274) of the Sung Dynasty, i.e. the period terminated by the Mongol
conquest of the City and Empire. Mr. Moule, who possesses the Chinese plan
(with others of the same set), has come to the conclusion that it is a copy
at second-hand. Names that are underlined are such as are preserved in the
modern Map of Hang-chau. I am indebted for the use of the original plan to
Mr. Moule; for the photographic copy and rendering of the names to Mr.
Wylie.

Sketch Map of the GREAT PORTS of FO-KIEN, to illustrate the identity of
Marco Polo's ZAYTON. Besides the Admiralty Charts and other well-known
sources the Editor has used in forming this a "Missionary Map of Amoy and
the Neighbouring Country," on a large scale, sent him by the Rev.
Carstairs Douglas, LL.D., of Amoy. This contains some points not to be
found in the others.

Itineraries of MARCO POLO, No. VI. The Journey through KIANG-NAN,
CHE-KIANG, and FO-XIEN.

1. Map to illustrate Marco Polo's Chapters on the MALAY COUNTRIES.
2. Map to illustrate his Chapters on SOUTHERN INDIA.

1. Sketch showing the Position of KYAL in Tinnevelly.
2. Map showing the Position of the Kingdom of ELY in MALABAR.

ADEN, with the attempted Escalade under Alboquerque in 1513, being the
Reduced Facsimile of a large contemporary Wood Engraving in the Map
Department of the British Museum. (Size of the original 42-1/2 inches by
19-1/8 inches.) Photolithographic Reduction by Mr. G.B. PRAETORIUS,
through the assistance of R. H. Major, Esq.

Facsimile of the Letters sent to PHILIP the FAIR, King of France, by ARGHN
KHAN, in A.D. 1289, and by OLJATU, in A.D. 1305, preserved in the Archives
of France, and reproduced from the _Recueil des Documents de l'Epoque
Mongole_ by kind permission of H.H. Prince ROLAND BONAPARTE.

Some of the objects found by Dr. M.A. Stein, in Central Asia. From a
photograph kindly lent by the Traveller.




WOODCUTS PRINTED WITH THE TEXT.

BOOK SECOND.--PART SECOND.


The BRIDGE of PULISANGHIN, the _Lu-ku-k'iao_ of the Chinese, reduced from a
large Chinese Engraving in the Geographical work called _Ki-fu-thung-chi_
in the Paris Library. I owe the indication of this, and of the Portrait of
Kbli Kaan in vol. i. to notes in M. Pauthier's edition.

The BRIDGE of PULISANGHIN. From the _Livre des Merveilles_.

BRIDGE of LU-KU-K'IAO. From a photograph by Count de SEMALL.

BRIDGE of LU-KU-K'IAO. From a photograph by Count de SEMALL.

The ROI D'OR. Professed Portrait of the Last of the _Altun Khans_ or Kin
Emperors of Cathay, from the (fragmentary) Arabic Manuscript of
_Rashiduddin's History_ in the Library of the Royal Asiatic Society. This
Manuscript is supposed to have been transcribed under the eye of
Rashiduddin, and the drawings were probably derived from Chinese originals.

Plan of Ki-chau, after Duhalde.

The CROSS incised at the head of the GREAT CHRISTIAN INSCRIPTION of SI-NGAN
FU (A.D. 781); actual size, from copy of a pencil rubbing made on the
original by the Rev. J. Lees. Received from Mr. A. Wylie.

Diagram to elucidate the cities of Ch'ng-tu fu.

Plan of Ch'ng-tu. From MARCEL MONNIER'S _Tour d'Asie_, by kind permission
of M. PLON.

Bridge near Kwan-hsien (Ch'ng-tu). From MARCEL MONNIER'S _Tour d'Asie_, by
kind permission of M. PLON.

MOUNTAINEERS on the Borders of SZE-CH'WAN and TIBET, from one of the
illustrations to Lieut. Garnier's Narrative (see p. 48). From _Tour du
Monde_.

VILLAGE of EASTERN TIBET on Sze-ch'wan Frontier. From _Mr. Cooper's Travels
of a Pioneer of Commerce_.

Example of ROADS on the TIBETAN FRONTIER of China (being actually a view of
the Gorge of the Lan t'sang Kiang). From _Mr. Cooper's Travels of a Pioneer
of Commerce_.

The VALLEY of the KIN-SHA KIANG, near the lower end of the CAINDU of Marco
Polo. From Lieut. Garnier in the _Tour du Monde_.

SALT PANS in Yun-nan. From the same.

Black Lolo.

White Lolo. From DEVRIA'S _Frontire Sino-annamite_.

_Pa-y_ Script. From the _T'oung-Pao_.

Garden-House on the LAKE of YUN-NAN-FU, YACHI of Polo. _From_ Lieut.
Garnier in the _Tour du Monde_.

Road descending from the Table-Land of YUN-NAN into the VALLEY of the
KIN-SHA KIANG (the BRIUS of Polo). From the same.

"A SARACEN of CARAJAN," being the portrait of a Mahomedan Mullah in Western
Yun-nan. From the same.

The Canal at YUN-NAN FU. From a photograph by M. TANNANT.

"Riding long like FRENCHMEN," exemplified from the Bayeux Tapestry. After
Lacroix, _Vie Militaire du Moyen Age_.

The SANG-MIAU tribe of KWEI-CHAU, with the Cross-bow. From a coloured
drawing in a Chinese work on the Aboriginal Tribes, belonging to W.
Lockhart, Esq.

Portraits of a KAKHYEN man and woman. Drawn by Q. CENNI from a photograph
(anonymous).

Temple called GAUDAPALN in the city of MIEN (i.e. Pagn in Burma), erected
circa A.D. 1160. Engraving after a sketch by the first Editor, from
_Fergusson's History of Architecture_.

The PALACE of the KING of MIEN in modern times (viz., the Palace at
Amarapura). From the same, being partly from a sketch by the first
Editor.

Script _Pa-pe_. From the _T'oung-Pao_.

HO-NHI and other Tribes in the Department of Lin-ngan in S. Yun-nan,
supposed to be the _Anin_ country of Marco Polo. From Garnier in the
_Tour du Monde_.

The KOLOMAN tribe, on borders of Kwei-chau and Yun-nan. From coloured
drawing in Mr. Lockhart's book as above (under p. 83).

Script _tha_ of Xieng-hung. From the _T'oung-Pao_.

Iron SUSPENSION BRIDGE at Lowatong. From Garnier in _Tour du Monde_.

FORTIFIED VILLAGES on Western Frontier of KWEI-CHAU. From the same.


BOOK SECOND.--PART THIRD.


YANG-CHAU: the three Cities under the Sung.

YANG-CHAU: the Great City under the Sung. From Chinese Plans kindly sent to
the present Editor by the late Father H. Havret, S.J., Zi-ka-wei.

MEDIAEVAL ARTILLERY ENGINES. Figs, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, are CHINESE. The
first four are from the Encyclopaedia _San-Thsai-Thou-hoei_ (Paris
Library), the last from _Amyot_, vol. viii.

Figs. 6, 7, 8 are SARACEN, 6 and 7 are taken from the work of Reinaud
and Fav, Du Feu Grgeois, and by them from the Arabic MS. of Hassan al
Raumah (_Arab Anc. Fonds_, No. 1127). Fig. 8 is from _Lord Munster's
Arabic Catalogue_ of Military Works, and by him from a MS. of
_Rashiduddin's History_.

The remainder are EUROPEAN. Fig. 9 is from _Pertz, Scriptores_, vol.
xviii., and by him from a figure of the Siege of Arbicella, 1227, in a
MS. of _Genoese Annals_ (No. 773, _Supp. Lat._ of _Bib. Imp._). Fig. 10
from _Shaw's Dresses and Decorations of the Middle Ages_, vol. i., No.
21, after _B. Mus. MS. Reg._ 16, G. vi. Fig. 11 from Perts as above,
under A.D. 1182. Fig. 12, from _Valturius de Re Militari_, Verona, 1483.
Figs. 13 and 14 from the _Poliorceticon_ of Justus Lipsius. Fig. 15 is
after the Bodleian MS. of the Romance of Alexander (A.D. 1338), but is
taken from the _Gentleman's Magazine_, 3rd ser. vol. vii. p. 467. Fig. 16
from Lacroix's _Art au Moyen Age_, after a miniature of 13th cent. in the
Paris Library. Figs. 17 and 18 from the Emperor Napoleon's _tudes de
l'Artillerie_, and by him taken from the MS. of Paulus Santinus (Lat.
MS. 7329 in Paris Library). Fig. 19 from Professor Moseley's restoration
of a Trebuchet, after the data in the Mediaeval Note-book of Villars de
Honcourt, in _Gentleman's Magazine_ as above. Figs. 20 and 21 from the
Emperor's Book. Fig. 22 from a German MS. in the Bern Library, the
_Chronicle of Justinger and Schilling_.

COIN from a treasure hidden during the siege of SIANG-YANG in 1268-73, and
lately discovered in that city.

Island MONASTERIES on the YANG-TZU KIANG; viz.:--

1. _Uppermost_. The "Little Orphan Rock," after a cut in _Oliphant's
Narrative_.

2. _Middle_. The "Golden Island" near Chin-kiang fu, after _Fisher's
China_. (This has been accidentally reversed in the drawing.)

3. _Lower_. The "_Silver Island_," below the last, after Mr. Lindley's
book on the T'ai-P'ings.

The West Gate of CHIN-KIANG FU. From an engraving in _Fisher's China_ after
a sketch made by Admiral Stoddart, R.N., in 1842.

South-West Gate and Water Gate of SU-CHAU; facsimile on half scale from the
incised Map of 1247. (See List of Inserted Plates preceding, under p. 182.)

The old LUH-HO-TA or Pagoda of Six Harmonies near HANG-CHAU, and anciently
marking the extreme S.W. angle of the city. Drawn by Q. CENNI from an
anonymous photograph received from the Rev. G. Moule.

Imperial City of HANG-CHAU in the 13th Century.

Metropolitan City of HANG-CHAU in the 13th Century. From the Notes of the
Right Rev. G.E. Moule.

_Fang_ of SI-NGAN FU. Communicated by A. Wylie.

Stone _Chwang_ or UMBRELLA COLUMN, one of two which still mark the site of
the ancient Buddhist Monastery called _Fan-T'ien-Sze_ or "Brahma's Temple"
at Hang-chau. Reduced from a pen-and-ink sketch by Mr. Moule.

Mr. PHILLIPS' Theory of Marco Polo's Route through Fo-Kien.

Scene in the BOHEA MOUNTAINS, on Polo's route between Kiang-Si and Fo-Kien.
From _Fortune's Three Years' Wanderings_.

Scene on the MIN RIVER below Fu-chau. From the same.

The KAAN'S FLEET leaving the Port of ZAYTON. The scenery is taken from an
engraving in _Fisher's China_, purporting to represent the mouth of the
Chinchew River (or River of Tswan-chau), after a sketch by Capt. (now
Adm.) Stoddart. But the Rev. Dr. Douglas, having pointed out that this
cut really supported _his_ view of the identity of Zayton, being a view of
the _Chang-chau_ River, reference was made to Admiral Stoddart, and Dr.
Douglas proves to be quite right. The View was really one of the Chang-chau
River; but the Editor has not been able to procure material for one of the
Tswan-chau River, and so he leaves it.


BOOK THIRD


The KAAN'S FLEET passing through the Indian ARCHIPELAGO. From a drawing by
the Editor.

Ancient JAPANESE EMPEROR, after a Native Drawing. From the _Tour du Monde_.

Ancient JAPANESE ARCHER, after a native drawing. From the same.

The JAPANESE engaged in combat with the CHINESE, after an ancient native
drawing. From Charton, _Voyageurs Anciens et Modernes_.

JAVA. A view in the interior. From a sketch of the slopes of the Gedh
Volcano, taken by the Editor in 1860.

Bas Relief of one of the VESSELS frequenting the Ports of JAVA in the
Middle Ages. From one of the sculptures of the BORO BODOR, after a
photograph.

The three Asiatic RHINOCEROSES. Adapted from a proof of a woodcut given to
the Editor for the purpose by the late eminent zoologist, Edward Blyth.
It is not known to the Editor whether the cut appeared in any other
publication.

MONOCEROS and the MAIDEN. From a mediaeval drawing engraved in _Cahier et
Martin, Mlanges d'Archologie_, II. Pl. 30.

The BORS. From a manuscript belonging to the late CHARLES SCHEFER, now in
the _Bibliothque Nationale_, Paris.

The CYNOCEPHALI. From the _Livre des Merveilles_.

ADAM'S PEAK from the Sea.

SAKYA MUNI as a Saint of the Roman Martyrology. Facsimile from an old
German version of the story of Barlaam and Josaphat (circa 1477), printed
by Zainer at Augsburg, in the British Museum.

TOOTH Reliques of BUDDHA. 1. At Kandy, after Emerson Tennent. 2. At
Fu-chau, after Fortune.

"CHINESE PAGODA" (so called) at Negapatam. From a sketch taken by Sir
Walter Elliot, K.C.S.I., in 1846.

PAGODA at TANJORE. From _Fergusson's History of Architecture_.

Ancient CROSS with Pehlvi Inscription, preserved in the church on ST.
THOMAS'S MOUNT near Madras.



Pages: | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | Next |

Main -> Cordier, Henri -> The Travels of Marco Polo — Volume 2